Blog | Drug Abuse

How Do I Identify Methadone?

Methadone is a narcotic pain reliever that is most commonly used for the treatment of opioid dependence and addiction. Under medical supervision methadone can allow someone addicted to opioids to undergo detox and withdrawal with minimal or reduced symptoms.1

Methadone typically comes in pill form with varying dosage strengths. There are numerous companies that manufacture and distribute methadone under different brand names, and each lab creates the pills differently.
 

What Does Methadone Look Like?

single white round pill

Methadone pills often look different depending on the dosage and manufacturer. Each pharmaceutical company has a different brand name for the drug, and there are many generics available as well. Some common iterations include the following:
  • Dolophine – It is sold in 5 mg and 10 mg strengths. Both are white, round pills. Their imprint numbers are 54 162 and 54 549 respectively.
  • Methadose – These pills are also white and round, and they are scored. They come in 5 mg and 10 mg dosages, and are identified with “Methadose 5” or “Methadose 10” depending on the strength.

Methadone can also be formulated as a liquid, and in generic version, there may be different physical attributes that are not listed above.

 

Methadone on the Street

Some common street names for methadone that may help in identifying methadone pills can include the following:

  • Dollies
  • Dolls
  • Junk
  • Metho
  • Fizzies
  • Wafer
  • Maria
  • Juice

 
Methadone has a high potential for abuse and can lead to dependence and addiction. Seeking out immediate professional help for the misuse of methadone is essential to avoiding serious health risks including addiction.2
 

Need Help Finding Treatment for Drug Addiction?

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction to methadone or other opioids and needs help, please call our toll-free helpline 877-345-8494. Our admissions coordinators are standing by 24 hours a day in order to help you find a treatment program that will work for you. Get help now - call us today.


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Sources

1 "Methadone." Medline Plus. 15 March 2018.

2 "Methadone." Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 28 September 2015.