How Does Rohypnol Work?

Rohypnol is a powerful sedative that acts as a central nervous system depressant. Rohypnol is significantly stronger than other common sedatives such as Valium. In most cases, Rohypnol is used in the short-term treatment of insomnia, as a pre-medication in surgical procedures and for inducing anesthesia.1

Rohypnol became prevalent in the United States in the 1990s when it was used as a date rape drug. This drug can be used in a variety of ways illegally such as crushing the pills and snorting the powder, sprinkling it on marijuana and smoking it, dissolving it in a drink or even injecting it.2

Rohypnol can also release growth hormones that enlarge the user’s muscles, which may make it popular among those looking for a quick physique boost.

 

Rohypnol can cause a number of immediate physical effects, including the following:
 
  • Intoxication
  • Loss of balance
  • Headache
  • Muscle relaxation or loss of muscle control
  • Difficulty with motor movements
  • Drunk feeling
  • Problems talking
  • Nausea
  • Can’t remember what happened while drugged
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Confusion3

Rohypnol often leaves individuals in a state of semi-unconsciousness or a coma. In some cases, sexual predators may add Rohypnol in powder or liquid form to the victim’s drink. When the drug is added to alcohol it slows the victim’s senses and bodily coordination. The effects of Rohypnol can last from eight to 26 hours, during which time the user has little to no memory of what transpired while he was under the influence of the drug.
 

Signs of Rohypnol Abuse

Drowsy woman

The individual’s loved ones may begin to see some signs of Rohypnol addiction in his behavior, including the following:
  • Symptoms of drunkenness without bearing the smell of alcohol
  • Lethargy and altered temperament
  • Refusal to answer inquiries about recent activities
  • Unexplained absence from school or work
  • Sudden financial problems
  • Severe withdrawal symptoms

If you think your loved one is facing issues with Rohypnol abuse, please contact us at Michael’s House so we can help you move forward.
 

How Long-Term Rohypnol Abuse Affects the Body

Although the user may start Rohypnol use for a legitimate reason — such as improving quality of sleep — it can be easy to overdose on this drug.

An overdose of Rohypnol can lead to many health problems, including the following:

  • Inhibited breathing and heart rate
  • Permanent memory loss
  • Seizures
  • Vomiting

The effects of a drug overdose can worsen if the user has taken other drugs at the same time. Once the user has build up a tolerance to Rohypnol, any attempt to quit without professional help will often end in frustration and continued drug abuse.

 

What Rohypnol Withdrawal Looks Like

It is common for the individual to experience uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms that prevent him from discontinuing use on his own.

Rohypnol withdrawal can result in a number of symptoms, including the following:
 
  • Extreme change in mood
  • Aggravated insomnia
  • Recurring headaches
  • Hallucinations
  • Anxiety
  • Uncontrollable trembling
  • Shock

If you or your loved one is going through drug withdrawal, professional drug treatment is the most effective way for an addict to safely detox from the drug and find lasting recovery.
 

Finding Help for A Rohypnol Problem

If you or someone you love is struggling with Rohypnol abuse, please call our toll-free helpline now at 877-345-8494. You too can find the healing needed to reach your full potential. Michael’s House is nationally recognized for providing integrated treatment for drug problems and co-occurring mental health issues. Our medical professionals are ready to treat your loved one so he or she can live a life without drugs.

Please call our toll-free number now for more information. We are proud to use evidence-based forms of treatment that bring results.


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Sources

1Rohypnol.” Drugs.com, Accessed on May 14, 2018.

2Rohypnol.” Drugfreeworld.org, Accessed on May 14, 2018.

3Date Rape Drugs.” Womenshealth.org, Accessed on May 14, 2018.

Speak with an Admissions Coordinator 877-345-8494