FACTS AND STATS Header

Drug addiction has reached epidemic levels across the globe. There are 230 million drug users worldwide.[1] In America, the problem is no better, with 19.9 million people using illicit drugs in 2007.[2] Despite the fact that American people make up only four percent of the global population, they still manage to use two-thirds of illegal drugs worldwide.[3]

America Drug Use
Nothing is off limits with 14.3 percent of Americans having purchased drugs online.[4] The 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health reported that 23.9 million American citizens over age 11 had used illicit drugs in the month preceding the survey.[5] Every year, drug and alcohol abuse in the United States comes with a $600 billion price tag.[6]

Emergency room visits for non-medical usage of prescription drugs went up from 627,291 visits in 2004 to 1,244,679 in 2009, a 98.4 percent escalation.[7] Patterns such as this suggest that drug abuse in America is steadily and significantly on the rise. In fact, according to the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, “In 2010, two million people reported using prescription opioids non-medically for the first time — nearly 5,500 people a day.”[8]

A 2008 study reported that drug-related overdoses had risen 56 percent in the previous 10 years.[9] While drug use was quite high in the late 1970s with 25.4 million people abusing them, relief came at a much lower rate of 12 million in the early 1990s; today, those numbers have risen once again, holding steady at 20.4 million in 2006.[10]

Marijuana

Marijuana

Since its discovery thousands of years ago, marijuana use has steadily risen to the levels it is at now, with 15 million people using it.[11] With over 94 million Americans having experimented at least once with marijuana, teens and those in their early 20s comprise the majority of the marijuana-abusing population, with 6.7 percent of youths ages 12 to 17 being users as of 2007.[12]

Synthetic Drugs

Bath Salts

Synthetic marijuana is now a major role player too, being second in line to naturally grown cannabis among high school seniors.[13] Other synthetic drugs, such as bath salts, have grown quickly in popularity since first entering the European drug market in 2008 and making their way to the US a year or so later. In 2010, synthetic marijuana was the reason for 11,406 emergency room visits.[14]

Cocaine

Cocaine

Cocaine is far more popular in foreign countries like Scotland and Brazil, but of the 4.6 million drug-related visits to US emergency rooms in 2009, 21.2 percent had illicit drugs like cocaine to blame, with cocaine alone accounting for 422,896 of them.[15] About 600,000 of the 2.4 million people using cocaine use the crack form of the drug.[16]

A cocaine user has a 5.1 percent increased risk of death in comparison to the general population.[17] People ages 26 to 34 are using cocaine the most out of all age groups with regard to lifetime prevalence.[18]

Heroin

Heroin

Heroin is still most widely used in countries like Afghanistan where the substance is harvested from opium poppy pods grown there. In recent years, growing popularity for the drug in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States led to Baltimore, Maryland, being dubbed the heroin capital of America.[19]Heroin was to blame for 213,118 emergency room visits in 2009.[20] In 2007, more than 2,000 people lost their lives to heroin overdose.[21] Heroin is accountable for most of the 18 percent of opiate-related treatment facility admissions in the United States.[22]

Hallucinogens and Stimulants

LSD

LSD is growing in popularity among young adults with 4.2 percent of those ages 15 to 24 in Europe having used the drug.[23] Inhalants are far easier to come across and that may account for the 22.9 plus million people in America who have indulged in inhalant experimentation at least one time.[24]

Stimulants like amphetamines were responsible for 93,562 emergency room visits in 2009.[25] Hallucinogens like Ecstasy are a part of the lives of one million Americans, and over 750,000 people are using amphetamines.[26] In fact, according to the Monitoring the Future survey, seniors in high school reporting past-year non-prescribed use of amphetamines went from 6.8 percent in 2008 to 8.7 percent in 2013.[27]

Prescription Drugs

Pills

Prescription painkillers are one of the most commonly abused substances, with 15 million people using them.[28]

Abuse of this class of drugs has become increasingly common among suburbanites, likely due to their availability. In 2009, 27.1 percent of drug abuse-related emergency room visits were a result of ingesting prescription drugs, OTC medicines, or diet pills.[29] One in every 10 high school 12th grade students has admitted to incorrectly using prescription painkillers.[30] The most commonly abused prescription drugs include medications like Xanax and OxyContin, and the number of people abusing painkillers in recent years has risen by 12 percent.[31]

Nicotine

Often forgotten about and categorized as being less dangerous than hard substances like crack cocaine and heroin, nicotine is still a popular drug of choice for many. Currently, 61 million Americans are cigarette users.[32] Fortunately, while this number is still high, smoking has been shown to be decreasing across the board in our nation’s youth.[33]

Despite health concerns over this legal drug, people continue to light up and inhale chemicals like tar, formaldehyde and arsenic into their lungs and body. During 2010, 158,248 of the 201,144 Americans diagnosed with lung cancer died.[34]

9-Nicotine and Alcohol 2010 Stats

Alcohol

While many attempts have been made over the years to lessen alcohol consumption, it would seem advertising and media portrayals of alcohol as safe for daily use have won out. While alcoholism is highest in other countries, such as Russia, the US isn’t far behind, with 17 million Americans diagnosed with an alcohol use disorder.[35]

About 14.3 percent of all emergency rooms visits in 2009 in the United States were due to side effects of alcohol use in conjunction with other drugs.[36] In 2008, there were 29,202 overdoses including both drugs and alcohol.[37]

Unfortunately, alcohol overdose is on the rise, showing a 25-percent increase between 1999 and 2008.[38] On top of those statistics, alcohol isn’t only harming the user, with 10,228 deaths in 2010 stemming from drunk-driving vehicular accidents.[39]

Causes of Addiction

Mental illness plays a huge role behind the scene of many addictions, with 2012 statistics reporting that 8.4 million Americans who abuse substances also suffer from at least one mental illness.

[40] Many other people simply succumb to the pressures of daily life. Sometimes financial or legal troubles drive someone to start drinking too much; other times, social activities including marijuana or other drugs creep in through a back door in your life and slowly take over. For some, the genetic predisposition to alcohol abuse via their addicted parent sets them up for a lifetime of battling alcoholism.[41]

Demographics

While many are of the opinion that drug abuse is a problem for the poor, lazy or desolate, statistics show that abuse of certain drugs is increasing among unlikely demographics like non-urban dwellers. Per WebMD, the “typical heroin user is a middle-class suburban dweller who started off with prescription painkillers, a new study reports.”[42]

Approximately 199,429 of 2009’s emergency room visits were among youths and young adults under the legal drinking age of 21.[43] Of those, 76,918 were for adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17.[44] Drug abuse among teens was also higher than ever in 1979 at 3.3 million, which later dropped to 1.1 million in 1992, and then rose again to 2.5 million in 2006.[45] A 2007 study ascertained that 45 percent of American high school students had consumed alcohol in the preceding month, with 19.7 percent admitted to having used cannabis.[46]

Reports in the past few years show that drug and alcohol abuse aren’t just for the poor anymore either, with wealthier kids being more likely to engage in the behaviors than kids from poorer backgrounds.[47] Drug abuse among parents is an unfortunate consequence of addiction at times too. Approximately six million American children have at least one parent who is abusing drugs and/or alcohol.[48] In some cases, the addict, parent or not, is a senior citizen and their age doesn’t exempt them from addiction. In 2010, 414,000 American adults ages 65 and older engaged in illicit drug use.[49]

Drug Addiction Treatment

With 23 million Americans being addicts, only 2.6 million seek the help they need to reach recovery.[50] These numbers leave many untreated with worsening addiction problems. What defines a successful treatment program? Our serene Palm Springs, California, treatment facility is the breath of fresh air you’ve been looking for. From interventions and detox to mental health care and addiction treatment, our full-service program will leave no stone unturned and leave you fully equipped to manage your health moving forward.

Now think about this: What defines a successful recovery? Is it the individual that never relapses? That’s what many are inclined to think. Unfortunately, this belief only serves to set nearly unattainable expectations, add unnecessary pressure, and make the addict feel like a failure if they do relapse. One study followed people enrolled in outpatient drug addiction treatment and determined that within the first six months following an initial treatment interview, 22 percent of female patients and 32 percent of male patients had relapsed.[51] The most important step following treatment is to have support in place for times when you are tempted to relapse.

Citations

[1] Buggle, A. (2013). “After 40-Year Fight, Illicit Drug-Use at All-Time High.” Huffington Post. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[2]Our Drug Culture.” (n.d.). Foundation for a Drug-Free World. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[3]High Society: How Substance Abuse Ravages America and What to Do About It.” (2008). CASA Columbia. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[4] Winstock, A. (2014). “The Global Drug Survey 2014 findings.” Global Drug Survey. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[5] Join Together Staff. (2013). “Rate of Prescription Drug Abuse Among Young Adults Holds Steady at 5 Percent.” Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[6]Cost of Substance Abuse.” (n.d.). National Institute on Drug Abuse. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[7]Drug Facts: Drug-Related Hospital Emergency Room Visits.” (2011). National Institute on Drug Abuse. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[8]With Abuse and Overdose Rates at an All-Time High, Harkin and Alexander Announce the HELP Committee Prescription Drug Abuse Working Group.” (2014). US Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[9]Study Hospitalizations Increase for Alcohol and Drug Overdoses.” (n.d.). National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[10]High Society: How Substance Abuse Ravages America and What to Do About It.” (2008). CASA Columbia. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[11] Ibid.

[12]The Truth About Marijuana: International Statistics.” (n.d.). Foundation for a Drug-Free World. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[13]Drug Facts: Spice (“Synthetic Marijuana”).” (n.d.). National Institute on Drug Abuse. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[14]Drug-Related Emergency Department Visits Involving Synthetic Cannabinoids.” (2012). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[15]Drug Facts: Drug-Related Hospital Emergency Room Visits.” (2011). National Institute on Drug Abuse. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[16]High Society: How Substance Abuse Ravages America and What to Do About It.” (2008). CASA Columbia. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[17]The fatality rate among heroin, cocaine users 14 times higher than for general population.” (2014). Plataforma SINC via Science Daily. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[18]1997 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse: Cocaine Use, by Age Group.” (2008). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Accessed July 11, 2012.

[19] Yang, C. (2014). “Part I: Baltimore Is the U.S. Heroin Capital.” ABC News. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[20]Study Hospitalizations Increase for Alcohol and Drug Overdoses.” (n.d.). National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[21]Unintentional Drug Poisoning in the United States.” (2010). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[22]International Statistics.” (n.d.). Foundation for a Drug-Free World. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[23] Ibid.

[24] Ibid.

[25]Study Hospitalizations Increase for Alcohol and Drug Overdoses.” (n.d.). National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[26]High Society: How Substance Abuse Ravages America and What to Do About It.” (2008). CASA Columbia. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[26] Ibid.

[27]Monitoring the Future Survey, Overview of Findings 2013.” (2013). National Institute on Drug Abuse. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[28]High Society: How Substance Abuse Ravages America and What to Do About It.” (2008). CASA Columbia. Accessed July 10, 2014.

 

[29]Drug Facts: Drug-Related Hospital Emergency Room Visits.” (2011). National Institute on Drug Abuse. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[30]International Statistics.” (n.d.). Foundation for a Drug-Free World. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[31] Ibid.

[32]High Society: How Substance Abuse Ravages America and What to Do About It.” (2008). CASA Columbia. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[33]Monitoring the Future Survey, Overview of Findings 2013.” (2013). National Institute on Drug Abuse. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[34]Lung Cancer Statistics.” (2010). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[35]Alcohol Facts and Statistics.” (n.d.). National Institute on Alcoholic Abuse and Alcoholism. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[36]Drug Facts: Drug-Related Hospital Emergency Room Visits.” (2011). National Institute on Drug Abuse. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[37]Study Hospitalizations Increase for Alcohol and Drug Overdoses.” (n.d.). National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[38] Ibid.

[39]Impaired Driving: Get the Facts.” (n.d.). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[40]Severe mental illness tied to higher rates of substance abuse.” (2014). National Institutes of Health. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[41] Gold, M. (n.d.). “Children of Alcoholics.” PsychCentral. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[42] Norton, A. (2014). ”Today’s Heroin Abusers Often Middle Class: Study.” WebMd. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[43]Study Hospitalizations Increase for Alcohol and Drug Overdoses.” (n.d.). National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[44] Ibid.

[45]High Society: How Substance Abuse Ravages America and What to Do About It.” (2008). CASA Columbia. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[46]Our Drug Culture.” (n.d.). Foundation for a Drug-Free World. Accessed July 10, 2014.

[47] Join Together Staff. (2007). “Study Finds Rich Kids More Likely to Use Drugs Than Poor.” Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[48] Child Welfare Information Gateway. (2009). “Parental Substance Use and the Child Welfare System.” Child Welfare Information Gateway. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[49]Prescription and Illicit Drug Increases for Baby Boomers, Senior Citizens.” (2012). Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[50] Join Together Staff. (2013). “Rate of Prescription Drug Abuse Among Young Adults Holds Steady at 5 Percent.” Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. Accessed July 11, 2014.

[51] Stocker, S. (1998). “Men and Women in Drug Abuse Treatment Relapse at Different Rates and for Different Reasons.” National Institute on Drug Abuse. Accessed July 10, 2014.